PrecisionLender.com

PrecisionLender is an extremely extensive cloud (Windows Azure) application consisting of probably the single most fully featured and beautiful business application written in Silverlight 4 currently around. In addition to this there is also our public facing MVC application that hosts all of our marketing material, login page and a full featured help (editable and expandable in real-time by admins) and support site complete with training videos, tutorials, the ability to log support cases directly to our support department and numerous deep integrations with our CRM system to enable our sales and front-line support staff to handle the vast majority of issues that arise without ever needing to expend any development team effort.

This project is a perfect example of the benefits of software done*right *– if any of our customers any where in the world ever encounters an error, our development team is instantly notified via extremely detailed e-mail complete w/ the error message, stack trace and a few other pertinent bits of information. Usually within a matter of minutes we’re able to resolve these issues and can then, with the click of a button, deploy the fix to every single user of our system without even a second of downtime or a single user interrupted. Likewise we’re able to develop, test and deploy new features the same way with a turnaround rate of ‘several’ to a dozen+ features pushed to customers every week.



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Commerce Network

Commerce Network is a product I created for a small Wilmington, NC – based company by the name ofPrimeVendor Inc. It was designed to electronically handle all invoices, purchase orders and receiving reports passed between the private sector and the United States government in addition to all state governments governed by the US. At the time of creation it was typical of most government agencies (and many contractors) to handle all of this manually on paper through snail mail and faxes with humans processing the documents. Needless to say, the cost savings of replacing all of these humans and paper with a software, paperless solution are dramatic and compelling.

In order to meet these lofty goals the product had to bedesigned in such a way as to support any and all delivery mechanisms, protocols and data formats and,similarly, be able to then transform this data of ‘any’ format to an output destination of ‘any’ protocol in whatever format the receiver required. It also had to be able to scale to the levels of potentially handling billions to trillions of such interactions in a day. Additionally, we needed a web portal accessible by both our clients and the agencies they dealt with where the users could create, send and receive these documents in addition to being able to view the logs of all documents that passed through our system (and bring up each archived document for display).

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PV-Spiders

This is another product I created forPrime Vendor in Wilmington, NC in order to collect all the bid information offered by any government agency in the United States.

The core problem here was that there’s somewhere around hundreds of thousands of organizations in the United States government that post bids for private contractors to, well, bid upon. Many of these organizations post multiple new bids every day – some of which are streamed out of a database but, surprisingly, lots of these government agencies still relied on human beings to update their tables of offers. When your job is to create a network of ‘spiders’ that go to these pages and are just supposed to check if anything has changed since their last visit and, if so, download the new data and submit it as a new bid.. well, there are often complications.

All the people before me faced with this problem created programs that’d establish HTTP requests to these sites and then attempted to parse the html text that came back in a meaningful way where they could then either download the bid or continue on to the next stage of the website until they can, hopefully, inevitably get to the direct bid file. Many sites required you to login and provided hundreds to thousands of results over the course of several html pages – and many others were almost entirely javascript which these spiders just couldn’t go to.

Being a little lazy, I decided toforgoall of thisnastinessand instead chose to extend the built in .NET WebBrowser control to the point where you could register parsing events to given Uris and, whenever the browser control would hit one of these Uris, the event would be called and you’d have the entire page parsed for you already in the form of the DOM (Document Object Model). You could then use Linq (or old-school for-loops, should you prefer) to extract out whatever information you needed from this page in a handful lines of code. You could even executeJavaScript. This entire overhaul of the WebBrowser control took about 50 lines of code and less than an hour to develop.

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GeoBump

This story has somewhat of a twisted/interesting plot to it – in the Spring semester of my Junior year of high-school we were told to pick a topic for our “Senior Project” and find a mentor that would, a year later, sign off on our work and try and guide us on the right path for our career. Being heavily involved in game development and 3D computer graphics for around 5 years at that point and living only two hours away, I decided to be a little randy and contact Tim Sweeney – the lead programmer at Epic Games.

Much to my surprise he actually responded back and said that he might be interested but wanted me to put together a demo for him within two weeks. While reading his response the entire left side of my body went numb, literally, and I could no longer move that half of my body. I very slowly somehow managed to make my way downstairs to the kitchen where I found my brother, Nate, and attempted to ask him for a drink of water. After several minutes of attempting this only to see him look back with an odd look on his face I ended up getting the water myself with extraordinary difficulty. I have no memory of the next several hours except waking up around 3AM in my bed (having no clue how I got there) andvomitingprofusely well into the morning. My mom woke up at one point and decided to let me stay home the next day. The vomiting continued for around three days and I didn’t return to normalcy or school for, coincidently, two weeks. Coming from a relatively large, very low income family and having a 3D game engine demo to write from scratch, I chose to skip the hospital visit and instead spent every waking moment where I wasn’t vomiting ordeliriouson the demo. Having never actually been checked out, no one really knows for sure what happened to me but the general consensus was that it was either a stroke and/or heart attack.. at age 16.

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